It’s A Bird, It’s A Plane, It’s Kryptonian Hawkman! Issue #8 Reviewed

by Josh Davison

[*Mild Spoilers Ahead!]

Hawkman has arrived at the remains of Planet Krypton. He is searching for a connection to a prior life on the planet. Thankfully, it doesn’t take him long to find a way, but he arrives on Krypton moments before its destruction. There and then, he finds his former self, Catar-Ol. Catar was expecting Carter, and Catar is happy to know that his legacy lives on. However, he is unsure how to help Carter fight the Deathbringers. He did build a weapon, but is the size of a city and not easily shared or moved.

Hawkman #8 cover by Bryan Hitch and Alex Sinclair
Hawkman #8 cover by Bryan Hitch and Alex Sinclair

Hawkman #8 spotlight the long-awaited Kryptonian life of Hawkman.

It’s an issue primarily consisting of the single conversation between Carter and Catar. Carter is seeking answers, and Catar gives as many as he can.

Consequently, the only distinctly Kryptonian part of the story outside of Catar is the destruction of Krypton itself. Jor-El, Zod, nor Brainiac have a part in the tale. Catar does have a connection to Kara, but she doesn’t make an appearance in the comic either.

That said, it is still a compelling read. It shows to men at their lowest point, one desperate to make up for a murderous previous life while the other is witnessing the absolute death of his home.

Despite this, they manage to find hope in one another, and it’s an uplifting thing. Carter is left ready to redouble his efforts to stop the Deathbringers, and Catar is left at peace as he faces death.

Hawkman #8 art by Bryan Hitch, Andrew Currie, Andy Owens, Jeremiah Skipper, and letterers Richard Starkings and Comicraft
Hawkman #8 art by Bryan Hitch, Andrew Currie, Andy Owens, Jeremiah Skipper, and letterers Richard Starkings and Comicraft

As always, Bryan Hitch’s artwork impresses, and his rendition of the Kryptonian skyline is downright inspired. His character work is stunning as well, and there isn’t a page in the comic that isn’t worth at least a second look. The color art of Jeremiah Skipper remains the same high quality throughout, giving the book a similarly gorgeous palette.

Hawkman #8 is a low-action but overall deeper issue of the Winged Warrior’s series. Carter meets his Kryptonian self and learns that Hawkman is more than just a man seeking redemption for a cruel past. Hitch, Skipper, and inkers Andrew Currie and Andy Owens bring another gorgeous issue to boot. This one definitely earns a recommendation. Give it a read.

Hawkman #8 comes to us from writer Robert Venditti, artist Bryan Hitch, inkers Andrew Currie and Andy Owens, color artist Jeremiah Skipper, letterers Richard Starkings and Comicraft, cover artist Hitch with Alex Sinclair, and variant cover artist Bill Sienkiewicz.

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