Political Cartooning Round Up From The UK – Trump Visits, Tory Leadership Elections To Vote In The Next Incompetent

by Richard Bruton

Well, you seemed to enjoy the political cartooning round up from these British Isles last month, so we figured we’d treat you again. Not that much happened this month… We had the D-Day celebrations, President Trump had a state visit with the Queen, Prime Minister Theresa May stepped down, to be replaced by the nightmare that is… well, take your pick really, although at this stage it’s looking like Prime Minister Boris Johnson (Oh, the fun we’re going to having with that nincompoop).

Start of the month…

D-Day celebrations were happening and the irony of celebrating that moment where Britain, America, and the combined Allied forces across Europe all worked together to free us from the threat of Nazi occupation just happened to be going on when Britain couldn’t be any more isolationist if it tried…

This from Andrzej Krauze

President Donald Trump breezed in to London, met the Queen, insulted the Mayor of London, and the US Ambassador suggested that the NHS (National Health Service – a free at the point of access health-care system that might have its faults, but is still the greatest thing government has ever done) was going to be on the table when it came to US-UK trade negotiations post Brexit.

Nicola Jennings on the Presidential visit

Martin Ronson in The Guardian

Steve Bell on Theresa May meeting Donald Trump…

Dave Kendall, not usually a political cartoonist, saw similarities with Goya…

And then there was the whole Conservative leadership election that pretty much took up the rest of the month in the cartoonist’s eyes. 12 MPs put themselves forward to be the next leader of the Conservative Party and the next Prime Minister of Great Britain. There were a series of votes by MPs to weed out the minnows from the truly incompetent big names. And it seemed that every single one of them is determined to throw Britain off the political isolationist cliff that is Brexit…

Chris Riddell makes his feelings known on that matter…

Martin Rowson on the Tory leadership race…

And Rowson‘s take on the whole voting experience (Tory MPs vote for a new leader, dropping a few each time the vote happens until only two are left – at which point the vote goes out to the Tory Party members around the country)

This from Nicola Jennings on the first round of voting…

And speaking of the truly incompetent big names, here’s Steve Bell on the man who looks most likely to be the next leader. God help us all. Boris Johnson.

Peter Brookes on the not so magnificent seven left after the first round of voting…

More Steve Bell on Boris, but also a comment on the bizarre events of the campaign bringing out many of the contenders looking to admit past drug taking…

On the same subject – Ben Jennings

The thing with the Tory leadership race was that, even though everybody knew it was going to be Boris (God help us all), they still had to go through the voting process, meaning every few days in mid June we had more grist to the political cartoonist’s mill, including the delights of seeing the same privileged white men debate on TV…

Here’s Steve Bell‘s take on those TV debates…

Cut to end of the month and we’re left with just two options – Boris Johnson and Jeremy Hunt… or at least the Conservative Party membership get to vote on the choice of two… Chris Riddell sums that particular contest up perfectly…

And then Boris – as Boris does – manages to make another mess of things. A neighbour hears a disturbance in the home Boris shares with his partner and calls the police – and the Guardian newspaper. Boris refuses to talk about it, as he always tends to with all the things he’s done wrong in the past… as Ben Jennings sums up so well…

End of the June, the UK looks away from politics just a little bit when the festival-goers descended in Glastonbury – if you get chance to watch Stormzy’s blistering set, including a particularly anti-Boris sing along on Vossi Bop, it’s well worth it.

Here’s the ever-great Stephen Collins on the wonders of Glasto…

And finally, in Birmingham, parents and anti-gay rights activists are protesting outside a primary school (4-11 years old for God’s sake) about the idea that LGBTQ relationships should even be countenanced as something normal in a school syllabus. It’s a ridiculous thing anyway, here in 2019, but to stand outside a school and intimidate children, parents and staff is just hideous.

Esther McVey MP, hideous creature that she is, suggested that ‘parents know best’ when asked about the issue. Really, Esther? Really? I think we all know at least a handful of parents where that absolutely aint true.

Anyway, here’s what Neil Slorence had to say about that in The National

 

And to end, lest we forget how important political cartoons are, we had the news in June that the New York Times was pulling all political cartooning from their international editions of the paper after the backlash over a cartoon by the Portuguese cartoonist António Moreira Antunes depicting Israeli prime minister Benjamin Netanyahu as a guide dog leading a blind Donald Trump.

Yes, it might have been a distasteful cartoon, it certainly overstepped the boundaries of good political cartooning, but to just wipe out all political cartoons is a real over-reaction, stripping the paper of a valid and powerful way of commenting on the politics of the day.

For more detailed background and opinion, read this from Martin Rowson where he sums it up so perfectly as being “A gross overcorrection, even though the outcry had some justification” and…

“Cartoons have been the rude, taunting part of political commentary in countries around the world for centuries, and enhance newspapers globally and across the political spectrum, in countries from the most tolerant liberal democracies to the most vicious totalitarian tyrannies. As we all know, they consequently have the power to shock and offend. That, largely, is what they’re there for, as a kind of dark, sympathetic magic masquerading as a joke”.

(Martin Rowson)

There’s also this from The Washington Post. Together with this commentary from Patrick Chappatte:

Leave a Reply

%d bloggers like this: