Reasons To Binge She-Ra And The Princesses Of Power

by Benjamin Hall

[***Warning of spoilers for She-Ra Princess of Power (1985-1986) and She-Ra and the Princesses of Power (2018-Present).]

She-Ra Princess Of Power (1985-1986) is the spin-off of He-Man and the Masters of the Universe (1983-1985). It features Prince Adam/He-Man’s sister Adora/She-Ra and her friends fighting to free the world of Etheria. Like her brother, Adora looks no different (other than her clothing) to her super-powered identity. But her allies and enemies do not know she is She-Ra. The main villains in this show are Hordak, Shadow Weaver, and arguably others like Catra and Scorpia. There are positive social messages at the end of each episode.

She-Ra and The Princesses Of Power (2018-Present) is a reboot/reimagining of She-Ra Princess Of Power. Its major differences are: The connections to He-Man and his mythos are only teased at. Also, instead of being episodic this version has several plot lines continue from episode to episode. It is also arguable that the main focus of this show is the character interactions versus the actual war being waged for Etheria. (This is especially true for Adora and her friend turned enemy Catra.) Lastly, Adora’s main allies know she is She-Ra, while most of her enemies do not. This is handled by She-Ra being noticeably taller than Adora, and her not hiding it from her allies, and Catra (and another) having seen the transformation.

There are a few reasons why people should binge watch She-Ra and the Princesses of Power on Netflix. The first is that this show provides kid-friendly entertainment in a way that is not annoying and/or inane. Meaning this version of She-Ra is more like an Avatar: The Last Airbender (2005-2008) (which expects viewers to think) than a Hanna Montana (2006-2011) (which waters down logic for viewers) type show. One of the ways it expects viewers to think is not doing the pro-social message at the end. Instead they are naturally woven into the show with characters facing dilemmas and realistically solving them. There is also great LGBTQ positive representation, particularly with a certain character’s parents. Finally there is action and darker elements at just the right level to provide thrills and chills for young (and young at heart) viewers.

Benjamin Hall

Among Benjamin Hall's many credits he is the creator and writer of the comic Time Trio; a writer/editor of various works for Sequart Organization; Blogger for Rippersspot.blogspot.com; a columnist for Comicon. He holds a Bachelor's in film studies and a Master's Degree in Media Communications. He is also an Aspie.

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