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Alan Moore

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INTRODUCTION

UNSEEN SUPREME
  • NEW JACK CITY PGS 1-8
    By Alan Moore and Rick Veitch

    SELECTED WRITINGS
  • "HOLY SMOKE"
  • "MAII.23.HOR.6.POST MERIDIEM. MORTIAK."


    SCRIPTS
  • "THE MIRROR OF LOVE"


    1963
  • WHAT HAPPENED TO THE ANNUAL?
  • INTERVIEW WITH AFFABLE AL


    PERFORMANCE ART
  • THE BIRTH CAUL
    By Alan Moore, David J, Tim Perkins
  • THE MOON AND SERPENT GRAND EGYPTIAN THEATRE OF MARVELS
    By Alan Moore, David J, Tim Perkins
  • BROUGHT TO LIGHT
    By Alan Moore and Gary Lloyd



  •     BACK TO ALAN'S MAIN PAGE

    ALAN MOORE

    PROPOSED TEXT FOR "HOLY SMOKE":
    "WHAT IS REALITY?"

    Reality, at first glance, is a simple thing: the television speaking to you now is real. Your body sunk into that chair in the approach to midnight, a clock ticking at the threshold of awareness. All the endless detail of a solid and material world surrounding you. These things exist. They can be measured with a yardstick, a voltammeter, a weighing scale. These things are real.

    Then there's the mind, half-focused on the TV, the settee, the clock. This ghostly knot of memory, idea and feeling that we call ourself also exists, though not within the measurable world our science may describe. Consciousness is unquantifiable, a ghost in the machine, barely considered real at all, though in a sense this flickering mosaic of awareness is the only true reality that we can ever know.

    The Here-and-Now demands attention, is more present to us. We dismiss the inner world of our ideas as less important, although most of our immediate physical reality originated only in the mind. The TV, sofa, clock and room, the whole civilisation that contains them once were nothing save ideas. Material existence is entirely founded on a phantom realm of mind, whose nature and geography are unexplored.

    Before the Age of Reason was announced, humanity had polished strategies for interacting with the world of the imaginary and invisible: complicated magic-systems; sprawling pantheons of gods and spirits, images and names with which we labelled powerful inner forces so that we might better understand them. Intellect, Emotion and Unconscious Thought were made divinities or demons so that we, like Faust, might better know them; deal with them; become them. Ancient cultures did not worship idols. Their god-statues represented ideal states which, when meditated constantly upon, one might aspire to.

    Science proves there never was a mermaid, blue-skinned Krishna or a virgin birth in physical reality. Yet thought is real, and the domain ofthought is the one place where gods inarguably ezdst, wielding tremendous power. If Aphrodite were a myth and Love only a concept, then would that negate the crimes and kindnesses and songs done in Love's name? If Christ were only ever fiction, a divine Idea, would this invalidate the social change inspired by that idea, make holy wars less terrible, or human betterment less real, less sacred?

    The world ofideas is in certain senses deeper, truer than reality; this solid television less significant than the Idea of television. Ideas, unlike solid structures, do not perish. They remain immortal, immaterial and everywhere, like all Divine things. Ideas are a golden, savage landscape that we wander unaware, without a map. Be careful: in the last analysis, reality may be exactly what we think it is.

    - Alan Moore.

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