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Alan Moore

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INTRODUCTION

UNSEEN SUPREME
  • NEW JACK CITY PGS 1-8
    By Alan Moore and Rick Veitch

    SELECTED WRITINGS
  • "HOLY SMOKE"
  • "MAII.23.HOR.6.POST MERIDIEM. MORTIAK."


    SCRIPTS
  • "THE MIRROR OF LOVE"


    1963
  • WHAT HAPPENED TO THE ANNUAL?
  • INTERVIEW WITH AFFABLE AL


    PERFORMANCE ART
  • THE BIRTH CAUL
    By Alan Moore, David J, Tim Perkins
  • THE MOON AND SERPENT GRAND EGYPTIAN THEATRE OF MARVELS
    By Alan Moore, David J, Tim Perkins
  • BROUGHT TO LIGHT
    By Alan Moore and Gary Lloyd



  •     BACK TO ALAN'S MAIN PAGE

    ALAN MOORE

    The Unseen Supreme

    Surely one of the lamest knock-off characters of the whole Image Revolution was Rob Leifeld's mindlessly brutal version of SUPERMAN. SUPREME, as he was called, lumbered gracelessly through forty-odd issues, ripping off heads, tearing out entrails and grimacing psychotically as sales and interest fell away to just about zip. Somewhere in all this, the editor of the series, Eric Stephenson, offered Alan Moore the title, and Alan, seeing something in it that all others had somehow missed, surprised everyone by taking over the reigns with issue #42.

    Alan's SUPREME became what the publishers of SUPERMAN (sales of which were also dropping off) should have tried all along: a heartfelt reconnection of the modern overblown super-stereotype to the simple (but incredible!) worlds of the imagination that comics book heroes routinely inhabited in the past. The series quickly became a potent combination of thoughtfully wry superheroics and lovingly recreated valentines to Mort Weisinger, John Broome, and Julie Schwartz. By the second year of Alan's tenure, Chris Sprouse and Al Gordon had come on as regular art team to provide a beautifully elegant take on the post-post-modern hero and Rick Veitch's retro sequences had grown beyond Weisinger to embrace Neil Adams, Popeye, Li'l Abner, EC Horror and Science Fiction Comics, MAD, and more.

    (One of the questions often asked about SUPREME is why DC Comics didn't send in their legal beagles to put an end to the fun? The answer is that creating knock-offs of another company's characters was widely prevalent among comics publishers during that period, and DC was as guilty as everyone else of the practice. There were stories that circulated to the effect that DC management was indeed pressuring the publishers of AWESOME COMICS to drop SUPREME, but these rumors remain unsubstantiated.)

    With sales figures increasing every month, Alan was preparing an outline for his third year on SUPREME when AWESOME COMICS investors pulled out and everyone was left high and dry. Scripts were written up to issue #63. Some of these were completely or partially drawn but never saw print. What you can read here is an unpublished 8 page section of SUPREME #62, with script by Alan Moore, art by Rick Veitch and lettering by Todd Klein (none of whom were fully paid for their work). The art is slightly incomplete, because Chris Sprouse and Al Gordon were meant to put the finishing touches on the SUPREME figure throughout to keep him more in line with their modern version of the character. In an interview, Veitch called this "the best story Alan and I ever did together". It's a lovely valentine, too; to one of the greatest cartoonists who ever lived. Ladies and gentleman, Part 1 of "NEW JACK CITY"...

    COMING SOON!





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