Page 1 of 2 1 2 >
Topic Options
#213096 - 11/17/99 04:42 AM how can i scan comics without thaem looking crap?
70sman Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 11/17/99
Posts: 9
Loc: Uk
thats my question.
HOW CAN I SCAN MY COMICS WITHOUT THEM LOOKING CRAP?

I want to stick them on a website , but at current scanner quality , they're not even legible. Please help , or you'll be missing out on such extraordinary titles as "The life and Times of Bob otterbaiter" "Baron the Flying elephant" and "log-Jam - the adventures of an alcoholic rock band."

Top
#213097 - 11/17/99 10:25 AM Re: how can i scan comics without thaem looking crap?
Wadji Offline
Member

Registered: 01/19/99
Posts: 303
Loc: Los Angeles, Ca., USA
What resolution are you scanning? How big (in pixels) are your files? How big is your original? Are they in color?

Around 75 dpi is standard resolution for photos on the web. But you might want to try 100, depending on how detailed your work is.

Usually I scan my work at 300 dpi and then shrink them. (I'm not sure how big of a difference that is, though)

------------------
Elan' Rodger Trinidad

see my funny little drawings at:
http://www.geocities.com/Area51/Starship/3044
_________________________
Elan' Rodger Trinidad

see my funny little drawings at:
http://www.someguynamedelan.com

Top
#213098 - 11/17/99 11:00 AM Re: how can i scan comics without thaem looking crap?
Hugo Offline
Member

Registered: 03/22/99
Posts: 452
Loc: Rockford, Il. USA
The other question is how good is your scanner? Is it a $30 after rebate office max variety or is it worth while? If you're saving your scans as .jpg you might have the compression set too high.

Top
#213099 - 11/17/99 01:12 PM Re: how can i scan comics without thaem looking crap?
eric hess Offline
Member

Registered: 12/19/98
Posts: 488
Quote:
Around 75 dpi is standard resolution for photos on the web.


72 dpi is standard web resolution (well, on an 800x600 monitor display). actually, though, browsers can display files of other resolutions, but the size they are displayed at on screen will vary accordingly. (e.g., a 6x10-inch file scanned at 72 dpi displays at half the size of the same file scanned at 144 dpi, if you see what i mean.)

70sman, you might want to scan at a higher res than 72, especially if you want decent reproduction of any dialog baloons, etc. keeping lettering clean and legible in the transition from printed page to online is a problem. i'd recommend scanning at 108 dpi to start with... or, you may find that 72 works just fine.

then you need to decide on what file format you want the scans to be. if your pages consist mainly of large areas of "flat" black, white, and/or colors, i'd recommend saving as GIFs, since GIF compression works best on that kind of image. if your stuff is more photographic or airbrushed or has lots of gradated colors or greys, you should save as JPEG, since that's what JPEG does best. when saving as JPEG, you'll need to decide on the amount of file compression to be used (usually 1-10, or 1-100, depending on the graphics software you're using). the higher the compression value, the better quality the image will be, but the larger the file size will be. 8 (or 80) is the default compression value for photoshop and fireworks, and it is indeed just about the optimum combination of file size vs. image quality.

you'll probably just have to experiment with file formats, compressions, & scan resolutions to see what works best for you.

hope this helps!

[This message has been edited by eric hess (edited 11-17-1999).]

Top
#213100 - 11/18/99 10:48 AM Re: how can i scan comics without thaem looking crap?
LongBox.com Offline
Member

Registered: 02/15/99
Posts: 33
Loc: Durham, NC, USA
Check out the article on ComicAddict ( http://comicaddict.longbox.com ) for scanning tips. It can be found under other features on the manu.

------------------
L. J'amal Walton ljamal@ravelution.net

Enjoy comics check out
The Long Box www.longbox.com

Senior Consultant
Ravelution Inc. www.ravelution.net
_________________________
L. J'amal Walton ljamal@longbox.com
Enjoy comics check out LongBox.com

Top
#213101 - 11/18/99 01:32 PM Re: how can i scan comics without thaem looking crap?
70sman Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 11/17/99
Posts: 9
Loc: Uk
cheers for the advice.
I was actually using the college scanner (which by all accounts is a good one) and , as such , have no idea of size/ filetype etc.
But its obviously more complex than I thought.
Ill see if I can change the settings etc. and see if I can get it any better.
The comics are only A4 to start with , and pixelation seems to be a problem.

Top
#213102 - 11/18/99 02:28 PM Re: how can i scan comics without thaem looking crap?
eric hess Offline
Member

Registered: 12/19/98
Posts: 488
if pixellation is a problem, definitely try scanning at higher res and/or adjusting compression (if saving to a JPEG).

70sman, is your scanner a hewlett-packard? if so, you're probably using "deskscan ii" software to scan with... i'd be happy to provide any help/tips for that if need be.

(btw... your occupation is "wastrel"? LOL!)

Top
#213103 - 11/19/99 04:37 AM Re: how can i scan comics without thaem looking crap?
70sman Offline
Junior Member

Registered: 11/17/99
Posts: 9
Loc: Uk
well , according to the government my occupation is "student" , but y'know , I like to be honest.

Top
#213104 - 11/19/99 07:30 PM Re: how can i scan comics without thaem looking crap?
Jeff Zugale Offline
Member

Registered: 12/06/98
Posts: 1806
Loc: Los Angeles, CA, USA
Yeah, this is always a problem with scanned comics... although this sounds like maybe your scanner optics or the driver software ain't all that great. Best practice is to scan at 300 DPI or so and then use Photoshop's "Image Size..." to resample them down to 72 DPI (at the same "physical size," i.e. inch dimensions). With "interpolation" set to "bicubic" you usually get good results; I tend to use the Unsharp Mask filter to get those antialiased edges on type and line art looking better. I save my JPEGS usually at compression level 5 and "Baseline Optimized" which works really well. If it's only lineart, you can go down to level 3 and not see much difference.

A good idea is to have two sets of images on the site, one at 72 dpi so they're small and load fast, and one at maybe 144 -- which will display at twice the actual size in a browser, as eric said -- to better showcase the work.

------------------
Jeff Zugale
Pagan City Comics
www.pagancity.com
_________________________
Jeff Zugale www.jeffzugale.com/
My "Just A Bit Off..." webcomic

Top
#213105 - 12/29/99 03:41 AM Re: how can i scan comics without thaem looking crap?
lee in Limbo Offline
Member

Registered: 10/08/99
Posts: 138
Loc: Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
What Eric and Jeff said is valuable advice, especially if you're using good graphics toys to begin with. I'm into photoshop 5.0, and find the image size function under the image list invaluable, especially since I'm a high fidelity freak with a pentium III, who can and will scan all work at, are you ready, gang, 600 dpi. Immediately after it parks in photoshop, (I use a Umax Astra 600S, with Vistascan software, umm, 3.0, I think){Nope, 3.1}, I click off the resample image box for a second, increase the pixels (on bicubic, in inches) to 1200, click the resample image box back on (look for the check mark, especially after 3:00 am, when the constantly reconfiguring height, width and pixel proportions almost look pretty, but useless) and then make a judicious decision as to how much image I want to play with, and how much magnification I prefer to do my clean up work in. I'm really anal about that stuff when money is on the line. I've spent hours perfecting sloppy lines (or sloppier white-out),at magnifications of 400 and 500 times (if I see pixels clearly at 300x, I step back in the history list to before the image resize, and start over. It's easier to subtract than multiply, and we're talking about professional quality imagery, here, not stuff to amuse yourself at 5:00 am.), though not in the last couple of months, thankfully. The pros: high resolution allows you to touch up a multitude of sins, even with a plain old mouse, with only a minor modification to your usual drawing technique. If you've ever done life drawing with chalk, charcoal, or conte, you're a step up on regular pen'n'ink or pencils-only artists. And you can shrink it later, rmember. Hard to get pixels back after you've gone to work on an image at a certain size for a while. Puls, at large sizes, you can tailor the size of your image to multiple applications. Try making a half inch x one-inch jpeg, at it's 100% magnification from a web page, at the standard 72 dpi for thumbnail button images and small picture files, and then turn THAT into a larger one pager, or wall paper, if you so choose. Forget it. It's a visit back to photoshop to blur it and touch it up. Might as well go as big as you and your 'puter can stand (and time constraints allow. I'm fussy and patient. Most aren't. And I'm not publishing a comic right now. Tells you something about my time frame, I think.) The cons: Photoshop working files nearly a gig in size, and visits to the temp folder if your hard drive is choking alot. Remember, I'm working on a graphics friendly computer. I deliberately handpicked the features that best complimented my work style. Could use more RAM for elbow room, though. Oh well, maybe later. Point is, though, you have to experiment with what gives you the best image sizes you can afford to work with, save as jpeg or gif (I'm a jpeg man myself, even with lineart, because I like to do my own colours.) often, and try not to save files at huge sizes for any longer than you have to. I generally store my images with no compression tools other than the jpeg optimizer, and I steer clear of progressive compression, because at least two image viewers in my life refuse to read them. Same goes for images slightly more than a meg in size. Then I resize them to fit my applications, and review them at 100% magnification to get the size the way I like it.

I'm sure there are some pieces missing, here, but others with more experience at loading images onto web pages are sure to fill in the gaps. Hope I haven't messed you up too much. I'm sure some guys are just freaking out at the amazing file sizes I like to use. Try them out if they suit you, but remember how time consuming and puter intensive they are. Then, just work down from there.

Good luck.

Lee Edward McIlmoyle.

------------------
A Day is Going to Come
When The World Will Politely Turn To Me, Admit It Was Wrong, And Apologize Sweetly. And I Will Accept That.

[This message has been edited by lee in Limbo (edited 01-02-2000).]
_________________________
Lee Edward McIlmoyle
[http://www.clearvisionstudios.net/gallery2/main.php]CLEARvision Studios[/url]

Top
Page 1 of 2 1 2 >


Moderator:  Rick Veitch, Steve Conley