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#439831 - 07/24/07 02:27 PM Iranian leaders - Nuclear weapons
David Porta Offline
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Registered: 06/15/03
Posts: 4823

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#439832 - 07/26/07 09:50 PM Re: Iranian leaders - Nuclear weapons
Paul Herden Offline
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Registered: 02/04/02
Posts: 1859
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David, since you're so interested in the National Review, you should check out this other thread, entitled "What Kind of Man Reads National Review?"

http://www.comicon.com/ubb/ultimatebb.php/ubb/get_topic/f/41/t/002134.html

Be sure to read the linked article, and then add your valued opinion! It just isn't a National Review thread without you!

http://news.independent.co.uk/world/americas/article2766040.ece

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#439833 - 07/26/07 11:16 PM Re: Iranian leaders - Nuclear weapons
David Porta Offline
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Registered: 06/15/03
Posts: 4823
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Back in the 1930s, the governments of the democratic countries knew what Hitler was doing — and they knew that they had enough military superiority at that point to stop his military buildup in its tracks. But they did nothing to stop him.

Instead, they turned to what is still the magic mantra today — “negotiations.”

No leader of a democratic nation was ever more popular than British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain — wildly cheered in the House of Commons by opposition parties as well as his own — when he returned from negotiations in Munich in 1938, waving an agreement and declaring that it meant “peace in our time.”

We know now how short that time was. Less than a year later, World War II began in Europe and spread across the planet, killing tens of millions of people and reducing many cities to rubble in Europe and Asia.

Looking back after that war, Winston Churchill said, “There was never a war in all history easier to prevent by timely action.” The earlier it was done, the less it would have cost.

At one point, Hitler could have been stopped in his tracks “without the firing of a single shot,” Churchill said.

That point came in 1936 when Hitler sent troops into the Rhineland, in violation of two international treaties.

At that point, France alone was so much more powerful than Germany that the German generals had secret orders to retreat immediately at the first sign of French intervention.

Why did the French not act and spare themselves and the world the years of horror that Hitler’s aggressions would bring? The French had the means but not the will.

It was morally paralyzed.

History may be interesting but it is the present and the future that pose the crucial question: Is America today the France of yesterday?

We know that Iran is moving swiftly toward nuclear weapons while the United Nations is moving slowly — or not at all — toward doing anything to stop them.

Nuclear weapons in the hands of Iran and its international terrorist allies will be a worst threat than Hitler ever was. But, before that happens, the big question is: Are we France? Are we morally paralyzed, perhaps fatally?

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