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#529176 - 11/17/08 10:42 AM CHAYKIN'S THEATER OF WAR WITH CAPTAIN AMERICA
Jennifer M. Contino Offline
Member

Registered: 08/01/02
Posts: 22928
Loc: PA

BY JENNIFER M. CONTINO
Howard Chaykin told THE PULSE that the original Captain America represented "a prefect vision of my idea of All American patriotism." He's been a fan of the hero for just about as long as he's been reading comic books. However, his latest project, the second installment in Marvel's Captain America: Theater of War series, subtitled "America First!" doesn't feature the original star-spangled hero. The one-shot stars the Captain America of the 1950s, working with a Nick Fury who isn't too thrilled to see another man wearing the costume of his friend. Chaykin, who has worked on Captain America several times in the past, told us what it was like revisiting this era of comic book lore ....


THE PULSE: I know you're no stranger to Captain America and have worked with the character several times throughout your career. What is it about this hero that you find the most appealing?

HOWARD CHAYKIN:
I loved Simon & Kirby's Golden Age stuff, and I was crazy about the reintroduction in Avengers # 4. I think it's just that Captain America represents a perfect vision of my idea of All American patriotism.

THE PULSE: When you were just a comic book reader, what do you think really set Captain America apart from other characters? When I was younger reading him, he just always seemed to be so GOOD. I mean, other heroes were good, of course they were good, but there was something so noble and good about Cap.

CHAYKIN:
Back in the '70s, [Walter] Simonson and I were thinking about pitching a miniseries entitled "Captain America's Four Freedoms.' At one point I said that when Captain America walked into a room you could smell the wheat fields waving in the autumn sunshine. That sounds like nobility to me.


THE PULSE: How is the 1950s Cap different from the one who rose to fame defending the world during World War II? I'll admit to not knowing much about this hero, other than he later went by the moniker "The Grand Director" and recruited Jack Monroe to be his Bucky.

CHAYKIN:
I'm using some of that continuity, while still staying true to the original spirit of Captain America.

THE PULSE: How was the battle that Captain America was fighting during the Cold War different than what Steve Rogers went through during, as Archie Bunker would put it, "The Big One!"?


CHAYKIN:
I grew up assuming I'd be nuked to death by Godless Communists--so whatever war was being fought in the '40s was simply replaced by the cold war, which scared the hell out of us. What Captain America was up against was a more insidious foe than the Nazis--since the Reds were assumed to be hiding under every bed.





THE PULSE: How soon after this new guy dons the familiar garb of Captain America does this story take place?






CHAYKIN:
The story takes place in the mid fifties. I'm purposefully vague as to when this new Cap hit the street.

THE PULSE: Why did you want to throw Nick Fury into this mix? I know you've worked on that character before, too, but what kind of X factor does he add?

CHAYKIN:
Fury gives us a direct connection to the politics and emotional state of the time an the country.


THE PULSE: I'd guess that Nick Fury isn't too keen on a new Captain America, especially considering the way he felt about the original Star Spangled Hero. How does he react to this man?

CHAYKIN:
You're right--and as for how, you'll just have to check the book out.

THE PULSE: Out of any character "active" at that point in time, what was it about Nick Fury that made him essential to this tale?

CHAYKIN:
The story takes place in the world of politics, espionage and intelligence. Who better?






THE PULSE: What are the challenges of doing the time warp to an earlier era and making the story feel relevant to today's audience? I mean, you make it look easy when you take on projects like this, but ...

CHAYKIN:
I love doing period material--and it's a matter of approaching the historical stuff as if it was an invented world, with the same conviction of a science fiction universe.


THE PULSE: Since you handled the writing and art, how did that simplify the creative process? I'd imagine it saved you a lot of time, because you didn't have to worry about another artist interpreting your vision and regard for the story ....

CHAYKIN:
I never think about things that way. I write for other people, I draw other writer's scripts, and I write and draw my own stuff. It's all of a piece.

THE PULSE: How did you decide the style in which to illustrate this?

CHAYKIN:
This isn't an intellectual decision I make. The job makes the decision for me.

THE PULSE: How long did it take you to create this story? What factors added to the length of time it took from writing the script to turning in the final pages?

CHAYKIN:
The book took three months.


THE PULSE: IS anyone inking or coloring your work here? If so, who else helped bring this tale to life?






CHAYKIN:
I'm writing, penciling and inking, with the fabulous Edgar Delgado handling the colors.

THE PULSE: What other projects are you working on?

CHAYKIN:
I'm working on a miniseries for the Marvel MAX line which should be announced early in the year--and planning the prequel to BLACK KISS.




Captain America: Theater of War: America First! is due in stores this December.

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#529183 - 11/17/08 11:38 AM Re: CHAYKIN'S THEATER OF WAR WITH CAPTAIN AMERICA [Re: Jennifer M. Contino]
johnconstantine Offline
Junior member

Registered: 11/14/08
Posts: 12
Loc: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

I love Chaykin and his work is always amazing. This Cap special will be on my list and a prequel to black Kiss, count on my.

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#529298 - 11/18/08 12:59 PM Re: CHAYKIN'S THEATER OF WAR WITH CAPTAIN AMERICA [Re: johnconstantine]
Jennifer M. Contino Offline
Member

Registered: 08/01/02
Posts: 22928
Loc: PA
Howard is really talented!

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