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#579461 - 11/05/10 12:34 PM Re: DVD -- GRADE [Re: madget]
Allen Montgomery Online   content
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Registered: 05/08/00
Posts: 7089
I would have settled for Rebecca Hall, or even Catherine Keener. Hall's character works in a mammography clinic, so they show a bunch of old ladies' boobs in the first two minutes of the movie. It was a combination of disappointment, and laughing at the realization I'd been had. Well played, Ms. Holofcener.
_________________________
"The trouble with being a ghost writer or artist is that you must remain anonymous without credit.
If one wants the credit, one has to cease being a ghost and become a leader or innovator."
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#579822 - 11/13/10 07:17 AM Re: DVD -- GRADE [Re: Allen Montgomery]
Stephen Parkes Offline
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Registered: 09/24/09
Posts: 390
Loc: The Bristol, Cuba St
The Social Network - Like

Just watched it tonight, and am still giving it consideration, but it was a good film. On a craft level it was superb: scripting, direction, acting, editing, design, photography, and a particularly good soundtrack by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross. The script was surprisingly funny, Sorkin's in his element with this blend of biopic and legal drama.

Some links:

Here, Sorkin replies to concern over the portrayal of women in the movie.

At the New York Review of Books Zadie Smith comments on The Social Network, and social networks. And there's a response at Tangled Web to some aspects of Smith's essay.

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#579825 - 11/13/10 10:11 AM Re: DVD -- GRADE [Re: Stephen Parkes]
madget Offline
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Registered: 05/11/01
Posts: 4870
This is an interesting comment from the writer, that makes me more interested in seeing it:

Quote:
Facebook was born during a night of incredibly misogyny. The idea of comparing women to farm animals, and then to each other, based on their looks and then publicly ranking them. It was a revenge stunt, aimed first at the woman who'd most recently broke his heart (who should get some kind of medal for not breaking his head) and then at the entire female population of Harvard.

More generally, I was writing about a very angry and deeply misogynistic group of people. These aren't the cuddly nerds we made movies about in the 80's. They're very angry that the cheerleader still wants to go out with the quarterback instead of the men (boys) who are running the universe right now. The women they surround themselves with aren't women who challenge them (and frankly, no woman who could challenge them would be interested in being anywhere near them.)


K

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#579847 - 11/13/10 09:01 PM Re: DVD -- GRADE [Re: madget]
Charles Reece Offline
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Registered: 08/18/99
Posts: 10013
Loc: us of fuckin' a
TSN was the first Fincher film I really liked. And I couldn't believe how great the dialogue was from Sorkin (having always dismissed him as a bland Hollywood liberal hack).

An excellent critique of the film.
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The Gospel, wherein much Truth is written.

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#579905 - 11/15/10 03:05 AM Re: DVD -- GRADE [Re: Charles Reece]
Stephen Parkes Offline
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Registered: 09/24/09
Posts: 390
Loc: The Bristol, Cuba St
Yeah Smith's article is well worth a read. Here's another response to it, from The Atlantic.

I'm finding the various arguments around this movie as interesting as the film.

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#579913 - 11/15/10 05:53 AM Re: various things [Re: Stephen Parkes]
Charles Reece Offline
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Registered: 08/18/99
Posts: 10013
Loc: us of fuckin' a
In this survey of my snot-filled consciousness, there's a trip down memory lane for comiconers featuring ideology and elvis, a bit about that Smith review of The Social Network (I'll give it an A-), a bit about Herzog's My Son, My Son, What Have Ye Done (another A-), something about deconstruction, and a great clip from Barbarella to commemorate De Laurentiis.

Looking forward to that Atlantic review.
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The Gospel, wherein much Truth is written.

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#579919 - 11/15/10 09:25 AM Re: various things [Re: Charles Reece]
madget Offline
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Registered: 05/11/01
Posts: 4870
Lynch's company produced Herzog's My Son, My Son -- am I reading that correctly? It's just interesting in that the quote you refer to from the movie sounds like a shot at Lynch.

I agree, about blogs. The clip makes me want to check out Barbarella sometime, I've never seen it. It's always looked fun.

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#579921 - 11/15/10 11:54 AM Re: various things [Re: madget]
Charles Reece Offline
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Registered: 08/18/99
Posts: 10013
Loc: us of fuckin' a
He's an executive producer.

Oh man, I didn't even think about TM in connection to that scene (I do my best to forget about TM). Good point. However, there's a real Lynchesque quality to the way the film's shot. But, yeah, Herzog's metaphysics isn't the same as Lynch's.

And you have to see Barbarella. It'll change your mind about comic book adaptations.
_________________________
The Gospel, wherein much Truth is written.

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#579987 - 11/16/10 09:08 AM Re: various things [Re: Charles Reece]
Allen Montgomery Online   content
Member

Registered: 05/08/00
Posts: 7089
Predators F

Robert Rodriguez warms over his rejected script from 1994, hires the director of the completely worthless Vacancy to make it. And there you have it. Quite possibly the most boring action movie I've ever seen.
_________________________
"The trouble with being a ghost writer or artist is that you must remain anonymous without credit.
If one wants the credit, one has to cease being a ghost and become a leader or innovator."
Bob Kane

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#580330 - 11/25/10 11:37 PM Re: various things [Re: Allen Montgomery]
madget Offline
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Registered: 05/11/01
Posts: 4870
HARD EIGHT:

PT Anderson's first film, and possibly my favorite after There Will Be Blood. Certainly it suffers none of the excesses of Boogie Nights and Magnolia. Philip Baker Hall is excellent as a mysterious figure who comes into John C. Reilly's life just when the latter has hit rock bottom. It's tough to say much more about the plot without giving things away; the narrative has four characters or so, and only has a few key points, and there's a lot of negative space around each. It feels like it was based on a short story. But I really liked its pacing; PT Anderson handles negative space well, and the characters have a chance to breathe, even if they are confined to Anderson's penchant for minimalist formalism. Subtle, odd, interesting, and smartly made. Not a ton to the story, but I really liked the way everything was handled, and the very neutral, noncommittal POV. Lots of unusual little thematic echoes, delicately traced. Great closing image. In an unexpected way, this movie shares a lot in common with A History of Violence; but it's better. Recommended, but if you don't like anything else PT Anderson's done Hard Eight probably isn't the one to win you over. If you've found some of his work interesting, check this one out. It's available on Netflix Instant.

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