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#597368 - 05/07/12 06:35 PM Re: The tools to create comics [Re: Real Hunter, Alll the time.]
MightyQuin Online   content
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Registered: 01/26/02
Posts: 1069
Loc: Tallahassee,FL
Howard seems pretty real and he sure knows his pencils! Allen, copying pencils to bristol board by copy machine sounds like it could have some very useful applications, are lines printed that way still erasable? If so, do they not smudge when erased like graphite would? Damaging the inkwork when cleaning up is definitely a problem, the reason, I guess, many, not me, are lightboxing their pencils. I've been looking for a better eraser, but a way around that problem would be a relief.

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#597373 - 05/07/12 08:34 PM Re: The tools to create comics [Re: MightyQuin]
Allen Montgomery Offline
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Registered: 05/08/00
Posts: 7089
What I do now is, draw layouts on pretty much anything. Scan them in, composite in Photoshop. If they're not tight enough, lighten them to around 15% (typically all I need to do is run AutoLevels, then select light Gray as the foreground color and White as the background color, then run Filters>Adjustments>Gradient Map), print it out on regular paper and tighten up the pencils some more. Scan that in, do the Gradient Map trick again and print on Strathmore for inking.

I tried printing in light Blue for a while, but that makes it too obvious what you've done even after inking. The Gray disappears behind the inks so much better. And yes, inkjet printing is erasable, but you shouldn't need to do much erasing at all with this method.
_________________________
"The trouble with being a ghost writer or artist is that you must remain anonymous without credit.
If one wants the credit, one has to cease being a ghost and become a leader or innovator."
— Bob Kane

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#597411 - 05/08/12 01:16 PM Re: The tools to create comics [Re: Allen Montgomery]
MightyQuin Online   content
Member

Registered: 01/26/02
Posts: 1069
Loc: Tallahassee,FL
Very cool and thanks! You've really got your process working for you.

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#597635 - 05/11/12 07:39 PM Re: The tools to create comics [Re: Real Hunter, Alll the time.]
Howard Simpson Offline
Junior member

Registered: 01/18/01
Posts: 14
Loc: USA
No, I'm not a spambot. Just spreading the love.

Can a spambot do this?

_________________________
Howard
http://www.abbadabba.com/ My Website
http://abbastudios.blogspot.com/ My Blog

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#597636 - 05/11/12 07:50 PM Re: The tools to create comics [Re: MightyQuin]
Howard Simpson Offline
Junior member

Registered: 01/18/01
Posts: 14
Loc: USA
Originally Posted By: MightyQuin
Howard seems pretty real and he sure knows his pencils! Allen, copying pencils to bristol board by copy machine sounds like it could have some very useful applications, are lines printed that way still erasable?


No you can not erase anything printed.
_________________________
Howard
http://www.abbadabba.com/ My Website
http://abbastudios.blogspot.com/ My Blog

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#597642 - 05/12/12 12:03 AM Re: The tools to create comics [Re: Howard Simpson]
MightyQuin Online   content
Member

Registered: 01/26/02
Posts: 1069
Loc: Tallahassee,FL
Originally Posted By: Howard Simpson
Just spreading the love.






Keep the love coming! Tech and artistic expertise are definitely appreciated around here.

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#597643 - 05/12/12 12:39 AM Re: The tools to create comics [Re: Howard Simpson]
Joe Lee Offline
Member

Registered: 06/22/01
Posts: 12277
Originally Posted By: Howard Simpson
Originally Posted By: MightyQuin
...copying pencils to bristol board by copy machine sounds like it could have some very useful applications, are lines printed that way still erasable?


No you can not erase anything printed.
But you can scrape the toner off with an exacto, without damaging the bristol board if you are really really careful. I'd practice it a few times before trying it in earnest.

Nice Eastwood. (but it did take me a second to figure out what that was, that it wasn't coming out of his nose I mean.)

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#597669 - 05/12/12 04:18 AM Re: The tools to create comics [Re: Joe Lee]
Peter Urkowitz Offline
Member

Registered: 08/28/00
Posts: 3231
Loc: Salem, MA, USA
Oh, is that a cigarette in his mouth, casting a shadow down his chin? At first I thought it was some kind of half-fu-manchu-mustache kind of thing. But other than that, great image!

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#597670 - 05/12/12 05:25 AM Re: The tools to create comics [Re: Howard Simpson]
Allen Montgomery Offline
Member

Registered: 05/08/00
Posts: 7089
Originally Posted By: Howard Simpson
No you can not erase anything printed.

Yes, you can. Inkjet ink does not set permanently right away. Very light tones are especially easy to erase. I also often laser print 10-15% gray on card stock, and that is easily erasable.

Ever apply Silly Putty to the newspaper? Notice how much lighter the printed image is after you do that?

Ever erase things out of school texbooks and draw in your own details?



You most certainly can erase printed items.
_________________________
"The trouble with being a ghost writer or artist is that you must remain anonymous without credit.
If one wants the credit, one has to cease being a ghost and become a leader or innovator."
— Bob Kane

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#603982 - 08/30/14 12:11 PM Re: The tools to create comics [Re: Allen Montgomery]
Howard Simpson Offline
Junior member

Registered: 01/18/01
Posts: 14
Loc: USA
Erasing ink as you describe is possible and damages the surface of the paper in order to remove the ink. And the paper becomes oily/ greasy and doesn’t accept ink in the same way as other parts of the paper, if you want to re-ink.

Yes, I’ve done the Silly Putty thing as a kid, you’re right.

So let’s talk about erasers.

ERASERS - Pink Pearl, plastic, art gum, kneaded and erasers are the kinds most often used.  You don't want to let your palm touch the paper while you're drawing. Hand oils and sweat harm the paper surface and can make it difficult to erase and to lay down ink. So you certainly don't want to buy an eraser that has oil in it.

Pink Pearl  has a pumice - a volcanic ash from Italy - that helps the organic rubber erase and gives it an abrasive quality. The rubber and vulcanized vegetable oil (factice) gives the Pink Pearl its distinctive aroma.

It's good to clean tarnished contacts on computer circuit boards, cotton upholstery, golf balls, gold, piano keys and to remove scuff marks from floors.Never use it on your art, as it is an abrasive eraser that loosens and removes the paper fibers. 

Plastic (vinyl) is  made of polyvinylchloride (PVC), calcium carbonate (chalk), chloride, and coloring agents among other ingredients. It is white or blue. It is gentle on paper and works better than pink erasers. They are prone to hand oil smears. They also smear when erasing large areas or dark pencil lines. It is much better for erasing light marks and precise erasing. On soft graphite it tends to smudge.

The residue left behind clumps together and can be easily brushed away.

This is used in electric erasers and as a stick in a knock pen.

Art gum (also known as soap eraser) is a brown solid factice eraser which may contain modifiers and chalk. It rubs out graphite cleanly without eroding away the actual paper surface or leaving behind smudges. Best used for large areas. Not good for precise work as it leaves pieces of eraser all over the place every time it is used. The residue must be blown or brushed away

Kneaded eraser is the gentlest on paper. Not as effective if you press down hard on your pencil. It is made of vulcanized vegetable oil (factice), natural and synthetic rubbers, pumice and coloring agents. Mold it with your fingers, stretching and folding, twisting and making the shape you need for precise or broad marks. Good for cleaning up, picking out soft highlights and gently graphite.

All of the above have oil in them which I stated is not good for the paper. So what is an artist to do?

The answer is simple use something that doesn't have oil, which is POSTER ADHESIVE (poster putty). This is the removable/reusable adhesive used to hang posters and papers sold in most drug and stationery stores. The actual ingredients are corporate secrets. The important thing is it contains no oil!

These erasers are great because they work like kneaded erasers and last a long time. It has greater tack and lifting strength. The adhesive is stretchy. This is great when you want to shape them to fit into a tight point or when you want to ball them up to eraser a wide area. Place it on an area that is a little too dark, press down and you can instantly lift graphite to lighten an area. Repeatedly touching the adhesive to a drawing pulls more graphite free, gradually lightening the work.

To clean this poster adhesive just stretch it out, fold it over and repeat until clean. Over time it does become gray, yet it is still good to use. After a long time when it has too much graphite it loses the smooth surface and gets sticky. Then it's time to move on to the next one in the pack. One pack can last years and years. To last even longer, don't use a entire piece. Just break off a small ball to use.

Now the best thing is to never use an eraser for mistakes. Use it as another art tool. 

If you draw light for your initial rough sketches/layouts or use non-repro blue, then you don't have to use an eraser.
_________________________
Howard
http://www.abbadabba.com/ My Website
http://abbastudios.blogspot.com/ My Blog

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