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#599527 - 07/16/12 12:09 PM Re: The books I'm reading thread... [Re: shjonescrk]
Joe Lee Offline
Member

Registered: 06/22/01
Posts: 12277
The Unknown Soldier, Vol. 1 Showcase was great fun, I love the original stuff, it was almost as good as The Enemy Ace Showcase.

Still working my way through a huge pile of Usagi Yojimbo trades.

Up next for me is Fear Agent vol. 2 & 3. Then the Spectre Showcase and I found a copy of the Killraven Essential at Half-Price Books. I never read that book as a kid, looks like fun.

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#599559 - 07/17/12 11:06 AM Re: The books I'm reading thread... [Re: Joe Lee]
Lawson Offline
Member

Registered: 11/11/02
Posts: 11978
Loc: Lexington, Ky.
UNION STATION

Written by Ande Parks
Drawn by Eduardo Barreto

An enjoyable original graphic novel, published in 2003 by Oni Press.

Set in Kansas City during the Great Depression, it's based on an actual 1933 shootout involving federal agents and gangsters at the city's magnificent train station. Always scheming, J. Edgar Hoover used this massacre to justify the formation of the Federal Bureau of Investigation. But as Parks shows us, the federal agents tried to keep secret their culpability in the bloody events of that day. Parks creates a newspaper reporter for the Kansas City Times to act as one of the protagonists, seeking to uncover the truth. In the end, though, the city's corrupt Pendergast political machine did not want anyone asking too many questions.

(Trivia note for U.S. history buffs not mentioned in this book: Harry Truman was placed in elected office by the Pendergast machine and remained loyal to it throughout his life, including his time in the White House. A stain on the reputation of an otherwise decent man.)

My only previous experience with Parks was as an inker, particularly with penciler Phil Hester on GREEN ARROW in the late 1990s. This was his first outing as writer. He turned in a well-crafted tale based on a lot of research in Kansas City, which he meticulously documented in end notes.

The late Barreto produced nice black-and-white artwork here. In hindsight, I think Barreto was a solid artist -- just not necessarily my first choice for a superhero comic. But then, he had the misfortune, in my youthful eyes, of following shortly after George Perez left THE NEW TEEN TITANS in the 1980s, which were impossibly large shoes to fill.

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#599820 - 07/26/12 10:59 PM Re: The books I'm reading thread... [Re: Lawson]
steel: A Long Departed Hero Offline
Member

Registered: 08/29/01
Posts: 4325
Loc: The MBA (Mysterious Blue Area)...
I finished an issue of STORMWATCH. It was pretty cool. Is #11 out?

Scott
@barbariancomic
_________________________
The Man of Mettle

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#599913 - 08/03/12 09:31 AM Re: The books I'm reading thread... [Re: steel: A Long Departed Hero]
shjonescrk Offline
Member

Registered: 10/31/03
Posts: 1351
Loc: Airdrie, Scotland
Just finished Urusawa's Pluto again. Great art all through though the story is not the greatest.

Just started on Crying Freeman again. The art by Ryoichi Ikegami is very (early) Frank Miller-esque but is this because Miller was inspired by Ikegami. I would guess so. Anyway, it's madcap crazy.

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#599914 - 08/03/12 12:33 PM Re: The books I'm reading thread... [Re: shjonescrk]
Lawson Offline
Member

Registered: 11/11/02
Posts: 11978
Loc: Lexington, Ky.
PARKER: THE SCORE

Story and art by Darwyn Cooke
(Based on the novel by Donald Westlake writing as "Richard Stark")

After much grumbling, I decided to keep buying Darwyn Cooke's comics outside of BEFORE WATCHMEN. I enjoy Cooke's work; no sense cutting off my nose to spite my own face.

THE SCORE is the third of Cooke's graphic novel adaptations of the crime-noir novels starring the amoral thief known only as Parker. It's as nicely done as the previous two. Stylish retro art. I didn't like the art's bright orange tone as much as I have the darker blue tones of the other books; but much of this book took place in a sandy canyon and/or surrounded by fires, so the color choice made sense.

The story is a great one, one of the more popular Parker novels: A dozen men rob a town. Literally, a whole town -- Copper Canyon, a small mining town in North Dakota. With careful planning, they sneak in at midnight, take over the necessary infrastructure (police station, telephone company), and then go on a quiet robbery spree. It goes exactly as planned, right up to the point that it doesn't, largely because one of the men didn't reveal his real motivation.

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#599915 - 08/03/12 04:06 PM Re: The books I'm reading thread... [Re: Lawson]
Allen Montgomery Online   content
Member

Registered: 05/08/00
Posts: 7070
This showed up in my downloads last week. Ugh.

There's a group of cartoonists who are mysteriously well-regarded simply because they have the ability to mix-and-match elements from actual innovators. Cooke is obviously one of the imitators, along with Ty Templeton, Kyle Baker and Frank Miller. Here, Cooke starts copying from the copiers. And much like the Xerox variety copies-of-copies, the degradation is apparent.
_________________________
"The trouble with being a ghost writer or artist is that you must remain anonymous without credit.
If one wants the credit, one has to cease being a ghost and become a leader or innovator."
Bob Kane

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#599916 - 08/03/12 05:10 PM Re: The books I'm reading thread... [Re: Allen Montgomery]
Lawson Offline
Member

Registered: 11/11/02
Posts: 11978
Loc: Lexington, Ky.
Originally Posted By: Allen Montgomery
This showed up in my downloads last week. Ugh.


Free or paid downloads?

I would criticize you for grabbing the man's work for free off the Web rather than paying for it -- if he hadn't surrendered his own moral high ground by cashing in on Alan Moore's hard work, without obtaining Alan Moore's permission.

As it stands, smoke 'em if you got 'em.

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#599955 - 08/03/12 11:44 PM Re: The books I'm reading thread... [Re: Lawson]
Allen Montgomery Online   content
Member

Registered: 05/08/00
Posts: 7070
That was pretty good!
_________________________
"The trouble with being a ghost writer or artist is that you must remain anonymous without credit.
If one wants the credit, one has to cease being a ghost and become a leader or innovator."
Bob Kane

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#599974 - 08/05/12 11:06 AM Re: The books I'm reading thread... [Re: Allen Montgomery]
steel: A Long Departed Hero Offline
Member

Registered: 08/29/01
Posts: 4325
Loc: The MBA (Mysterious Blue Area)...
I read the origin of Bane! It was awesome!

-Scott
@Barbariancomic
_________________________
The Man of Mettle

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#600023 - 08/07/12 10:14 AM Re: The books I'm reading thread... [Re: steel: A Long Departed Hero]
Lawson Offline
Member

Registered: 11/11/02
Posts: 11978
Loc: Lexington, Ky.
Atomic Robo, Vol. 1: Atomic Robo & the Fightin Scientists of Tesladyne

Story by Brian Clevinger
Art by Scott Wegener

What a delightful treat this is! I'd heard of ATOMIC ROBO but never sampled it until now. The premise is that Nikola Tesla invented a self-aware, smart-assed robot in the 1920s -- that would be Robo -- who remains with us today, fighting monsters and leading scientific expeditions and engaging in all sorts of crazy adventures.

The art is clean, cartoony and effective. The writing is snappy and imaginative. ROBO is a satire of all sorts of media -- science-fiction movies and superhero comics among them -- but it's a loving satire, not edgy or mean-spirited. There are moments of poignancy, as well.

Clever cameos by scientists including Carl Sagan and Stephen Hawking.

For aging fanboys like me who complain that there aren't enough stand-alone comics titles anymore that are simply creative and fun, ATOMIC ROBO is a great exception.

(This being Comicon, I dread the inevitable put-down as Allen tells me why ATOMIC ROBO sucks and what 1970s Japanese or Swedish cartoonists the creators are shamelessly ripping off, in his view.)

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