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#602506 - 11/26/13 10:49 PM Alan Moore
Defiant1 Offline
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Alan Moore finally admits that he doesn't like superheroes.

http://www.ign.com/articles/2013/11/25/alan-moore-finds-success-of-the-avengers-alarming
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#602512 - 11/27/13 06:55 AM Re: Alan Moore [Re: Defiant1]
Allen Montgomery Offline
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Pretty sure I've seen some review blurbs from Moore indicating that he's read superhero comics since he finished Watchmen, so that's likely an untruth.

I was thinking a while ago about an interview that Moore did berating the TV show Friends. He said something to the effect of, the interplay of the characters on Friends supersedes viewers' real life friendships. Then later he did another interview where he was gushing at length about another TV show, The Wire. Moore's stated reason for disliking one show versus his love of the other show seems ironic to me, since it likely takes a lot more memory reserve to keep up with the characters and plot of The Wire than it does for Friends.

I like the man's work, but there's a often a serious disconnect of logic in his spontaneous commentary.
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#602514 - 11/27/13 02:00 PM Re: Alan Moore [Re: Allen Montgomery]
Defiant1 Offline
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There's a lady in town that works at a comic shop. She's lettered his work and had dinner with him. She was telling about her conversations with him, but the details escape me. I've always detected a slight resentment towards superheroes when he writes. I've felt that it goes over the head of his fans. I don't really care for what I've read of Watchmen. I don't think it's highly creative to take a superhero and pervert his motivations. At the time it was different because the industry had been under the comics code for so long. In all honesty, I'd rather mainstream comics have some kind of moral compass so that kids could read them. That's pretty much tossed aside now that comics are mainly written for adults. I don't think it takes a lot of effort to research a topic in detail and then paste all the information you've learned into a script. I've always been underwhelmed by what he writes. I think his resentment towards the subject matter which has employed him is the key reason I'm underwhelmed.


Edited by Defiant1 (11/27/13 02:10 PM)
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#602518 - 11/27/13 03:09 PM Re: Alan Moore [Re: Defiant1]
Ceci n'est pas une chaussette Offline
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I keep waiting for Alan Moore to release a comic called Go Fuck Yourself. The first page will just say, "No, seriously. Go fuck yourself." The second will say, "You, reading this comic." The third will say, "This is not ironic, or metacommentary, or a metaphor of any kind. Go fuck yourself." The fourth will say, "I hate you." The remaining pages will just be assorted photos of Alan Moore angrily flipping the bird.
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#602519 - 11/27/13 03:13 PM Re: Alan Moore [Re: Defiant1]
Ceci n'est pas une chaussette Offline
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Originally Posted By: Defiant1
I don't think it's highly creative to take a superhero and pervert his motivations. At the time it was different because the industry had been under the comics code for so long.


Watchmen is a formal exercise of almost insane skill. When people look to it for an innovative superhero plot, they're disappointed.

I imagine people would be similarly disappointed if they tried to read Moby Dick for fishing tips.
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#602521 - 11/27/13 07:47 PM Re: Alan Moore [Re: Ceci n'est pas une chaussette]
Defiant1 Offline
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Originally Posted By: Ceci n'est pas une chaussette
Originally Posted By: Defiant1
I don't think it's highly creative to take a superhero and pervert his motivations. At the time it was different because the industry had been under the comics code for so long.


Watchmen is a formal exercise of almost insane skill. When people look to it for an innovative superhero plot, they're disappointed.

I imagine people would be similarly disappointed if they tried to read Moby Dick for fishing tips.


I was loaned the TPB and gave it back to the guy who loaned it to me about 3 issues in. I was more entertained by background references to things like "Gordian Knot Lock Company" and things like that. Unfortunately the main plot kept ruining my interest in the story.
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#602522 - 11/27/13 07:49 PM Re: Alan Moore [Re: Ceci n'est pas une chaussette]
Defiant1 Offline
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Registered: 03/07/04
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Originally Posted By: Ceci n'est pas une chaussette
I keep waiting for Alan Moore to release a comic called Go Fuck Yourself. The first page will just say, "No, seriously. Go fuck yourself." The second will say, "You, reading this comic." The third will say, "This is not ironic, or metacommentary, or a metaphor of any kind. Go fuck yourself." The fourth will say, "I hate you." The remaining pages will just be assorted photos of Alan Moore angrily flipping the bird.


The problem is that Hollywood would want to make a movie about it and we'd have to read articles with Alan Moore saying "I was serious!"
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#602620 - 12/13/13 03:55 PM Re: Alan Moore [Re: Defiant1]
Gerald Offline
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Writers like Alan Moore were writing superheroes for 40 year olds. Does he really think The Killing Joke was for 9-13 year olds? Miracleman?

I don't think he hates superheroes at all. Supreme, and his work at Image and at ABC show he has a genuine love for the genre. But because Avengers represents one of the big 2 who treated comic professionals so poorly he's attacking the film and the audiences.
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#602621 - 12/13/13 05:08 PM Re: Alan Moore [Re: Gerald]
Allen Montgomery Offline
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I read Moore's stuff when I was a teen. Moore himself was only 35 when the Killing Joke came out.
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#602622 - 12/13/13 07:07 PM Re: Alan Moore [Re: Allen Montgomery]
Gerald Offline
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Registered: 11/29/09
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And I read The Killing Joke when I was around 8 or 9. You probably think differently but I definitely don't think the comics I mentioned should be intended for 9 and 10 year olds, nor do I think there any different in content as modern Marvel and DC comics are, quality being a different story and up for debate.
I get the feeling that Alan Moore is embarrassed by his affinity for, and maybe his work with, superheroes. The medium has recently been taken more seriously, but only in regards to the films adapted from it. There's exceptions of course like Maus, but that came out during the 80s when the medium was getting more critical recognition of itself.
It's also interesting to note that he blames other writers for mimicking the gritty, more graphic themes in Watchmen, and applying them to mainstream superheroes, when he did the same thing with Batman (yes, I know he thinks it's his worst story. Not because he had the Joker shoot and paralyze Batgirl and strip her naked to take pictures of her, but because it didn't tackle any bigger themes like the arms race, political conspiracies or corporate elitism), and was going to do the same with Twilight of the Superheroes. If you read Judgment Day or Supreme he also laments or lampoons the grittiness of the 80s, and thinks the comics should get back to the essence of wonder of the early 60s in a modern way. Which is what he did with Supreme and Rob Liefeld's comic universe. Also, he was already 40 when starting work on Glory, Judgment Day and Youngblood. As I said, many of the references that he uses in his superhero comics would be missed by actual 9-13 year olds. I'm not saying that he wasn't targeting those groups as well, because he said as much in his Youngblood proposal. However, like most superhero comics published in the last 3-40+ years, they're trying to appeal to kids AND adults.
He thinks superheroes are a bad thing for adults, but after doing From Hell, he goes back to superheroes with Image, then launches his own comic line with Wildstorm, specializing in superheroes or "science heroes" like Tom Strong, Promethea, Top 10, and The Spirit inspired Grey Shirt.
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