>>>THEY'RE NOT CONFIDENT IN THEIR OWN PRODUCT, THEY WOULD RATHER TRY TO MAKE THE RETAILER TAKE ALL THE RISK WITH THEIR "BS" PRINT TO ORDER COLLECTABILITY CRAP!!<<<

Y'know, the more I read that, the more I think that the presented reason is far different from the real reason.

When Marvel overprints, two primary costs are incurred. 1) Printing fees -- especially if the overprinting isn't enough to reach a better per-unit price point. 2) Warehousing fees - because they can't just shove those comics into the Negative Zone while they wait for reorders.

Now those costs may balance out if Marvel does manage to sell the comics in question, but if they don't then they're left with a loss... and an ongoing cost on the warehoused comics.

So the question becomes: Can Marvel sell enough of the overprints to justify the costs incurred? Seems like the answer is no, so they dropped the plan.

Now, had Marvel come to the retailers and presented things that way, it would have been honest but also would have been a devastating admission about Marvel's current state. So instead, they looked for something -- *anything* -- they could say to retailers to warn them of the situation and give them fair opportunity to adjust their plans accordingly, but still keeping a positive face on the issue.

Unfortunately, they botched it. The way Jemas presented things, it does look like a ploy to restore the problems of the mid-nineties by making retailers increase their orders on anticipated "collectibles."

Well, sort of, because people seem to ignore the other things Marvel announced. For example, if a comic sells out to the DM, they will act quickly to make that issue available to readers -- by reprinting online, and by releasing a trade collection as quickly as possible. For example, the Ultimate Spider-Man #1-#3 reprint came out at the same time as #4, at a really good price point, and the TPB of #1-#7 will be out shortly after #7 prints.

So, if the objection comes from the fact that you can't get comic *readers* the *stories* they want, then that's not entirely correct -- you'll have it again in a fairly prompt method.

That said... I still think overprinting has its place. The first issues of Ultimate Spider-Man and Ultimate X-Men, for example, should have a big overprint... but #6 and on shouldn't. By then, the market should have established itself pretty well and retailers should be able to order accurately.

-J