Oh, and as for Walt's "great revelation" -- obviously it's not much a revelation to the audience at this point, but it's a fairly significant revelation (or at least admission) for Walt himself. But I don't think that's that, on that particular point. I think he did do it all in part for his family, but that that became a convenient excuse while blinded to how much (and how destructive) of an influence his ego was wielding over his decisions. Admitting it was for himself, because he liked it, was important, and represents a self-awareness Walt had been missing or too busy to pay much attention to, previously. But one thing that always struck me about Walt, even when the show wasn't specifically focused on it, was that he really did value his family, and valued providing and caring for that family. Walt's evil was believable because his course into evil always was in character. Infidelity or freedom from the family was never of any interest. His only act of direct infidelity to his wife was quite clumsy and quite obviously motivated by her infidelity to him, which he was genuinely hurt by. And in the end he does leave his family a $9 million payday. Sure, he put them in mortal danger and kind of ruined their lives in the process, but hey, just sayin'...

K